Parents and Professionals

Text teenhealth2 to 877877 to join our text messaging campaign to receive adolescent health messages.
 
One of the most important elements to keeping teens healthy is a positive relationship with a parent or guardian.  It is important for parents to communicate with their teens and be willing to listen. Ideally, caregivers are a teens' primary source of accurate information, guiding them to making safe and healthy decisions.  Because caregivers are influential in the success of adolescents, Teen Health Connection offers our bi-monthly health text messages to persons over 22 years old to provide helpful information about adolescent health.         

Resources for Parents and Professionals

Becoming a Love and Logic Parent
Teen Health Connection offers the Becoming a Love and Logic Parent Class to empower parents to raise adolescents who are confident and motivated.  Visit the Becoming a Love and Logic Parent page on our website for information on how to sign up for this class.
 
Parent Guide to Teen Health
Please read our Teen Health Connection Parent Guide to Teen Health, which is an invaluable educational tool for parents that covers adolescent "hot topics."  The parent guide also provides a directory of teen services in Mecklenburg County.  If you would like to request a physical copy of the Parent Guide to Teen Health please email Rett Liles at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.  and include your name, mailing address and the number of guides you are requesting.  
 
Johnston Ziegler Youth Leadership Award
Dr. John Gardner Johnston, Teen Health Connection's founding Medical Director, is known for his efforts to empower every adolescent to be healthy, safe and successful.  Barbara R. Ziegler, Teen Health Connection's founding Executive Director, is known for her outstanding commitment to improving adolescent health.  The Johnston Ziegler Youth Leadership Award is a merit-based scholarship awarded to a local teenager, who like Dr. Johnston and Barbara Ziegler, has demonstrated outstanding leadership, advocacy or service for adolescents.  Please visit the Johnston Ziegler Youth Leadership Award page on our website for more information about this scholarship.  

Information about Vaccines

Vaccines are very important because they decrease the chances of getting certain diseases.  It is important to vaccinate adolescents as well as young children.  

Listed below you will find information about vaccines available for adolescents.  The Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) and the Center for Disease Control (CDC) provided this information. 

Tdap (Tetanus, Diptheria and Acellular Pertussis) Vaccine

It is recommended that teens ages 11-18 years old receive a Tdap booster.  In North Carolina all students entering 6th grade must receive a Tdap vaccine to attend school.  This vaccine is one shot that lasts ten years.

1. Tetanus (also known as lock jaw): causes painful muscle spasms all over the body and it can prevent you from opening your mouth.  You can get tetanus through types of cuts and wounds, from animal bites, tattoos, body piercings, rusty nails etc.

2. Diptheria: caused by a bacteria that causes a thick covering in the back of the throat.  It can cause breathing problems, paralysis, heart failure and death.  Diptheria is spread person to person.

3. Pertussis (also known as whopping cough): caused by bacteria that can cause severe coughing spells, weight loss, pneumonia and sometimes death.  Pertussis is spread person to person and is highly contagious.   

Meningococcal Vaccine

It is recommended that all teenagers ages 11-18 years old receive a meningococcal vaccine.  This vaccine is also known as Menactra.  This vaccine prevents against four types of meningococcal disease.  The disease is a serious illness that infects the fluid around your brain and spinal cord.  Meningitis can be spread through coughing, kissing or sharing drinks.  Even when people diagnosed with meningitis are treated with antibiotics, 1 in 10 of these people die.  For the people that survive, up to 1 in 5 of them may experience brain damage, become mentally retarded, become deaf, suffer seizures, suffer a stroke and/or lose their arms or legs.  This vaccine is one shot only.  

Human Papillomavirus Vaccine (HPV)

It is recommended this girls and boys ages 9-26 years old receive HPV vaccine.  This vaccine is also known as Gardasil and it is most effective if received at an earlier age.  HPV is a virus that can cause abnormal pap smears and cervical cancer in females and genital warts in males and females.  This vaccine is a series of three shots.  

Measles, Mumps, Rubella Vaccine (MMR)

The MMR vaccine is recommended for all teenagers that have not had the vaccine as a young child. The vaccine is a series of two shots.

1. Measles: causes high fever and rash over the body and is highly contagious.

2. Mumps: causes swollen glands, fever, headaches and can lead to meningitis, deafness and sometimes death.  It is highly contagious.

3. Rubella: causes rash, fever and arthritis.

Hepatitis B Vaccine (Hep B)

It is recommended that all teenagers receive the Hepatitis B vaccine if they did not receive the vaccine as a young child.  Hepatitis B is a serious disease that affects the liver and can spread through contact with infected blood or bodily fluids.  It can cause liver damage, liver cancer and death.  This vaccine is a series of three shots. 

Hepatitis A Vaccine (Hep A)

It is recommended that all teenagers receive the Hepatitis A vaccine.  This vaccine protects against Hepatitis A which is a serious liver disease.  Hepatitis A can be spread from person to person or by eating or drinking contaminated food or water.  The vaccine is a series of two shots.

Varicella Vaccine (Chickenpox)

It is recommended that all teenagers that have not had the chickenpox receive this vaccine.  Chickenpox is a common disease that is spread by person to person contact that causes rash, itching, fever and tiredness.  This vaccine is a series of two shots. 

Influenza Vaccine (Flu)

The flu vaccine is recommended for all teenagers every year.  The flu is a contagious disease that is spread by coughing or sneezing.  The flu can cause fever, headache, body aches, sore throat, cough, fatigue and chills.   

More resources available on adolescent health topics

Customized and timely pediatric health information at www.healthychildren.org

Nutrition and physical activity information from the USDA's MyPlate project at www.choosemyplate.gov

Why Teens Need Access to Comprehensive Sexual, Reproductive Health Information and Services

The American Academy of Pediatrics Guidelines Regarding Contraception and Adolescents 

The American Academy of Pediatrics Clinical Report on Male Adolescent Sexual and Reproductive Health Care

Information about birth control methods at www.bedsider.org

Information about Keeping Teens Safe in the car www.safercar.gov/parents/index.htm

Keeping Youth Safe from Preventable Injury www.safekids.org/safetytips

 

 

 

 

 

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